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LAWSUITS NEWS & LEGAL INFORMATION

Vytorin Linked to Increased Risk for Cancer


Results from a new study of Vytorin, the SEAS study, just released, show a 50 percent increased incidence of cancer among people who were taking the cholesterol-lowering drug, compared to those on placebo. Additionally, the drug failed to show any slowing of aeortic stenosis, the primary of study endpoint. Investigators are forwarding their findings to the FDA and other regulatory agencies in countries where the drug is approved.

JUL-21-08: Ezetimibe/Simvastatin (Vytorin) Misses Major Cardiovascular Endpoints in SEAS Trial [MEDPAGE TODAY: VYTORIN ]

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LEGAL ARTICLES AND INTERVIEWS

Zetia and Vytorin Continue to be Controversial
Zetia and Vytorin Continue to be Controversial
August 28, 2017
Washington, DC: There is little doubt that the cholesterol-fighting drug Zetia (ezetimibe) has travelled a rocky road since it was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002. And while several years have passed since the controversial delay in releasing study results into potential Zetia side effects, issues involving Zetia and its cousin Vytorin (Zetia in combination with a statin) continue to lazily percolate like water at a gentle boil.
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Attorney Ben Stewart: Vytorin “Controversial”
Attorney Ben Stewart: Vytorin “Controversial”
March 7, 2013
Whitehouse Station, NJ With a study about Vytorin expected in the next month or two, patients deciding whether or not to use the medication must rely on previous studies regarding Vytorin side effects. Those studies suggest that Vytorin can cause serious adverse reactions, according to Ben Stewart, attorney at Stewart Law, PLLC. Although there are no personal injury lawsuits currently working their way through the courts, that could change, depending on what the anticipated study shows.
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