Request Legal Help Now - Free
LAWSUITS NEWS & LEGAL INFORMATION
Home Page >> News Articles >> FDA Issues Warning about Certain Homeopa..

FDA Issues Warning about Certain Homeopathic Remedies

. By
San Francisco, CAIt is not that every homeopathic remedy is a scam. The problem is when homeopathic fraud occurs; when a person or company markets a product that has no proven benefits and can, in fact, harm people. In such cases, consumers may be able to file a homeopathy fraud lawsuit, alleging they were injured by the use of the homeopathic product.

Homeopathy is based on a principle that medicine that resembles the symptoms of a condition assists your body in healing itself. Such remedies are controversial because it is not known exactly how they work, and because the claims made by homeopathic care providers or companies that market homeopathic remedies are often unsubstantiated. Depending on the condition being treated, the homeopathic remedy is usually available over the counter or via prescription. If the remedy is intended to cure minor conditions, such as a headache, then the remedy is self-prescribed by the patient and available over the counter. If it is for major conditions, such as cancer, it is prescribed by a physician.

The FDA has sent warning letters to companies that market homeopathic remedies, warning them about what they can and cannot say about their products. For example, on June 8, 2010, an FDA warning letter was sent to Homeopathy for Health, warning the organization that its website offered products to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure the H1N1 Flu Virus in people, despite the products not having been approved by the FDA for such purposes.

In cases where a homeopathic product is marketed to treat, diagnose, prevent or cure a condition that is considered a nationwide public health emergency—such as the H1N1 Flu scare—the FDA can take action against the product's makers.

More recently—in December 2011—the FDA announced that HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) weight-loss products that are sold over the counter and identified as "homeopathic" are illegal and make unsubstantiated claims. HGC weight-loss products, in the form of oral drops, pellets and sprays, are often sold in combination with low-calorie diets along with promises to lose 20 pounds in 30 days. The FDA notes, however, that the weight loss is caused by diets that allow for only 500 calories a day and not due to the use of HCG.

According to the FDA, HCG is approved to treat female infertility but not as a weight-loss drug. Furthermore, the prescription label reportedly acknowledges that there is no evidence that use of HCG increases weight loss beyond what would normally be lost under extreme caloric reduction.

An HCG advocacy group is appealing the FDA's announcement.

READ ABOUT HOMEOPATHIC REMEDY FRAUD LAWSUITS

Homeopathic Remedy Fraud Legal Help

If you or a loved one have suffered losses in this case, please click the link below and your complaint will be sent to a defective products lawyer who may evaluate your Homeopathic Remedy Fraud claim at no cost or obligation.

READER COMMENTS

Posted by

on
I am currently using a homeopathic remedy for poison oak itching and rash. Idk how well it really works all I know is itching does subside pretty rapidly but using homeopathic medicine to treat cancers and other major illnesses they must be crazy! The advancement in medicine has came too far for serious illnesses to be treated with homeopathic medicines. I understand for the most part most homeopathic drugs are fake anyway!

Posted by

on
Hi Mike, again, thanks for your words of wisdom--ps, if we weren't unbiased, we'd moderate your comments right over to the "delete" button. Be that as it may, the issue here (you can re-read our previous comment) is FRAUD. Truth is truth and given that FDA warning letters have been issued, and that many of the efficacy claims on the products in question are unsubstantiated, well, it's a recipe for false advertising/consumer fraud claims. Pure and simple. Is there a place for homeopathy? Yes. But are there manufacturers and marketers who are giving homeopathy a bad name by their marketing practices? Yes. Those companies are your target--not those who report on them.

Posted by

on
To anybody stumbling on this site thinking it has anything unbiased to say about remedies:

The "homeopathic remedy" hotlink in the first sentence links to an article on homeopathy remedy fraud. The article closes with another link to remedy fraud. In addition, there are at least 2 other ads for hucksters trying to drum up business related to remedy fraud.

This article is dis-informing you. If shame still had any effect, the author and site owners would remove it. Go somewhere else for information.

Posted by

on
Hi Mike, thanks for your comment. We've updated the article to better clarify when/how a homeopathic remedy would be prescribed (and btw, even some homeopathic manufacturers discuss how their products are "prescribed" on their websites);
The harm is in the homeopathic fraud--unsubstantiated promises and 'cures'. It's like OTC HCG for weight loss--you'll lose weight just by dropping back to 500 calories a day, irrespective of taking HCG. And, we might add, HCG is very confusing to the public at large as there is OTC HCG and that which needs to be administered by a doctor.
Unfortunately, while the harm caused may not be new injury, the lack of sustained (or any in some instances) improvement in one's condition after being promised such is injury and there is harm done to consumers.
Regarding ambulance chasing, yes, there are attorneys who adverstise on the website--as there are pharmaceutical companies who advertise on WebMD et al. Also, it might intererst you to know that one of our advertisements--depending on the rotation of banner ads you see as our website opens on your screen--is an ad from one of the leading homeopathic remedy manufacturers.

Posted by

on
Your story contains factual errors:

There have been no cases of proven harm from any homeopathic remedy.

Homeopathic remedies - of any kind - do not require prescriptions.

As you have 2 ads on this page seeking clients for "Remedy Fraud", this article is nothing more than virtual ambulance chasing.

ADD YOUR COMMENT ON THIS STORY

Fields marked * are mandatory. Please read our comment guidelines before posting.

*Name:

Note: Your name will be published with your comment.

*Email Address:

Your email will only be used if a response is needed.
*Your Comment:

Are you the defendant or a subject matter expert on this topic with an opposing viewpoint? We'd love to hear your comments here as well, or if you'd like to contact us for an interview please submit your details here.


Click to learn more about LawyersandSettlements.com
Request Legal Help Now! - Free