Comments
  • Anne Stuart April 4, 2012 at 11:39 am

    It is a good thing that the state of California is doing something sex offenders that gather in online dating sites. Also I think other states should do something about it as well.

    • Shunned April 4, 2012 at 4:20 pm

      Hi Anne. As a convicted sex offender, I'd like to weigh in here.

      My crime was continuing a sexually charged conversation online with a minor even after I learned that the person was a minor. I spoke to this girl for 30 minutes one time because I was bored at 2am. It did not matter that I did not initiate the conversation, and it did not matter that we both contributed to the nature of the conversation. I took a plea deal at the recommendation of my attorney and was sentenced to 2 years of probation and have never seen the inside of a jail cell in my life. I was not "arrested", I had traveled to the state where the minor resides only in order to answer to the charges that were brought against me. I had never before had legal problems yet I am now seen as a dangerous criminal even though my crime did not involve rape, touching, or even solicitation.

      If that was the end of it, felony + registration, I might be able to pick my head up and carry on and try to put it behind me. But it seems that every day I learn of a new law, bill, or policy that bans and restricts sex offenders from… everything.

      I was on Jdate looking for someone who could see past my situation and who shares my beliefs.

      It has been difficult enough to tell girls I start to date that I am a registered sex offender before feelings become developed, especially my own. I have already been hurt twice. But with all these restrictions and limitations being placed on functioning normally in society, what is my motivation in telling the truth? Typically I have always treated people with respect, trust, and been completely honest. I am that way because that is the kind of person I want to be and always have been. But if I am met with anger, distrust, and belittlement, then there is no point and it fills my mind and body with hopelessness and despair.

      With every new law that gets passed against sex offenders, I am reminded about the stories my grandfather had shared with me while he was in Germany prior to him being sent to a concentration camp. Fortunately, he was able to escape with fraudulent government papers.

      I understand completely that there are dangerous people out there. I lock my doors at night, I lock my car when I leave it in public, and I avoid bad areas in the city just like everyone else. That's common sense. But to isolate a group and say they are ALL like that is called stereotyping and to limit that group's liberty is persecution. First it was slavery, then segregation, it happened in Germany with the Jews, and even recent frequent genocides in other countries that most people don't hear about.

      I come from a great family, I am educated, and I am successful. But I spoke to a minor online about sex (who was actually more experienced than myself) and so who I am doesn't matter anymore.

  • ShanaRowan April 6, 2012 at 10:15 am

    This ban empowers predators who have never been caught by giving users a false sense of security.

    It also creates a more restrictive environment for former offenders, and in doing so, heightens the risk of re-offense.

    Sex offenders already have the lowest rates of re-offense other than murderers (www.endsexcrime.org/theproof.html#recidivism). This ban is simply a feel-good measure that no one can really enforce. Just another notch in Harris' belt is all.

  • Leave a Reply

Share this Page

RSS Feed
Legal Help Now
Newsletter Signup

Find us on

Find us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterFind us on LinkedInFind us on Foursquare

Follow us on Twitter

Our Facebook Activity

Popular Categories

Totally Tortelicious
Lawyers Giving Back
Pleading Ignorance
Asbestos News Roundup